Meet our ‘Netball Australia KNEE Program’ endorsed Physiotherapist – 2019

Knee are the most commonly injured body part of netballers. Injury to one of the major stabilisers of the knee, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), is a common problem, annually representing approximately 25% of serious injuries (Netball Australia National Insurance Data). The Netball Australia KNEE Program was developed with the support of the Australian Institute of Sport and is designed to reduce the incidence of these injuries occurring.

Recently Netball Australia announced that as part of the KNEE Program, it is looking to establish a network of physiotherapists proficient in delivering the program nationally. The completion of a course run by Netball Australia qualifies the physiotherapist as an Endorsed Provider of the program.

We are pleased to announce our Netball Australia KNEE Program endorsed Physiotherapist – Emma Iacovou 

EMMA IACOVOU

Emma is an experienced Physiotherapists and netball player. She currently treats many of the Peninsula Waves players and is passionate about the prevention of knee injuries in netball.

 

 

WHAT IS THE KNEE PROGRAM?
The KNEE Program is a warm up program designed to enhance movement efficiency and prevent injury. It targets how to land and how to move safely and efficiently.

Whether you are a coach to your child’s netball team, high performance coach, support staff or parent, this program is designed to keep your players on the court for longer and moving more efficiently when there.

As an athlete this program aims to keep you playing the sport you love without being sidelined by injury.

WHO SHOULD DO IT?

Three tiers have been devised to target all netball populations:

  • Junior (11 – 14 years)
  • Recreational (14 years and above)
  • Elite (players who have been identified in the Talent, Elite and Mastery category of Netball Australia’s Player Pathway)

 

WHY DO IT?

The KNEE Program is based on programs that have been proven effective in reducing lower limb injuries generally and specifically reducing ACL injuries from 40-70%. It will also improve the efficiency of movement on court.

HOW LONG DOES THE PROGRAM TAKE?

The program should take no more than 10–12 minutes to complete. Research indicates it needs to be done for a minimum of 10 weeks, 2-3 times per week to be most effective.

For more information or to make and appointment with Emma you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.

*Information above has been adapted from information provided at www.knee.netball.com.au and www.netball.com.au 




Why your landing technique in netball is so important in preventing injury – 2019

The Waves, Physiotherapists, Emma Iacovou teaches the girls the technique behind how to jump, land effectively, decelerate and change direction based on the guidelines set out by the Netball Australia ‘KNEE Program’.

Emma has a passion for netball and has played for Peninsula Waves in the past, so its great to combine her passion for netball with her knowledge as physiotherapists to help ensure netballers continue to play the game they love for as long as possible.

Why is injury prevention in netball important?

Netball has one of the highest injury rates per participant of any sport (Fong, 2007). At both an elite and junior level netball injury prevention is vital. During this dynamic fast paced sport, the body is exposed to high forces contributing to lower body injury rates (Mothersole, 2013). A staggering 85% of netball injuries occur at the knee and ankle, of this 45% of these injuries occur during landing (Netball Australia Personal Accident Insurance 2010-14). These statistics highlight just how import the correct jumping and landing technique is to enhance performance and prevent injury.

Conditioning and technique training to effectively mitigate injury risk and improve performance is particularly important amongst the female population (Mothersole, 2013). Recent figures show females are 4-6 times more likely than males to rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and it is estimated that as high as 25% of all major injuries in netball are attributed to ACL alone (Netball Australia, 2017). For netballers this means a costly injury that can result in more than 12 months away from the netball court.

How can you reduce your risk of an injury during netball?

Netball Australia have developed The KNEE Program, aiming to prevent knee injuries from occurring by optimising technique and enhancing efficiency of movement in netball specific landing, change of direction and deceleration . The KNEE program is an adaptable, evidence based, warm up program designed to be implemented at all netball levels; children, recreational and elite.

Below is are some of the key principles as set out by the KNEE PROGRAM which outline how to perform a jump and landing with good technique that, when practiced and implemented, aims to significantly reduce the likelihood of an injury during netball.

 
Jump Take Off
• Feet shoulder width apart
• Feet facing forwards
• Hips Bent
• Knees Bent
• Knees in line with feet
• Use arms to drive momentum

 

Jump Landing

• Hips bent
• Knees bent
• Roll down through feet
• Feet straight ahead
• Knees in line with feet
• Trunk Stable

Studies show that by implementing specialised training programs, such as the KNEE program, injury rates can be dramatically improved. These programs can reduce lower body injuries by up to 50% (Netball Australia, 2017). Furthermore, employing this program as a part of your own training has been found to improve performance measures. This is supported by Hopper et al (2017) whom found a 6 week injury prevention program improved speed, agility, power and balance outcomes. For greatest effect, these programs need to be performed total of > 30 minutes per week (Sugiomoto et al, 2014).

It is never to early or late to start implementing this program as a part of your netball routine. For more information on how to include The KNEE program in your training session or warm up click on the following link : http://knee.netball.com.au/.

For more information or to book an appointment contact your local clinic or Book Online.

 
References

The KNEE Program. Retrieved From: http://knee.netball.com.au/

Fong D, Hong Y, Chan L-P, Yung P, and Chan K-M. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports. Sports Med 37: 73-79, 2007

Hopper et al (2017). Neuromuscular training improves movement competency and physical performance measures in 11-13-Year-Old female netball athletes, Journal of strength and conditioning Research. 1165-1176, 31(5)

Mothersole, G. (2013) Ground Reaction Force Profiles of Specific Jump-Landing Tasks in Females: Development of a systematic and progressive jump landing model, Faculty of health and Environmental Sciences. Retrieved from http://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10292/5695/MothersoleG.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

Sugimoto, et al. (2014). Dosage effects of Neuromuscular training intervention to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: Meta-and-sub group analyses, Sports Medicine. 551-562, 44(4)

Netball Australia http://netball.com.au/




Three things you MUST know to be fit for finals

By Daniel Browne, Physiotherapist, Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre and Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic.

With the end to the winter sport season fast approaching, many of you will be preparing for a budding successful finals campaign on the charge for the premiership.

Entering finals can be challenging time for most athletes – emotions run hot, expectations are high and there’s a buzz in the air. Unfortunately though by this point of the season, we’ve often been nursing injuries and niggle’s for the past couple of weeks, or potentially even months and one week off depending on your sport, is generally insufficient time to get back to 100%. The beauty is everyone else is feeling the same way!

So here are our top three tips to gain an advantage over your opponents, as we knock down the door for the final month of winter sport:

1. Recovery

Often talked about, rarely performed well. As our bodies sustain wear and tear from day to day work, training and then competition, it is essential that we give our bodies the right tools to recover. Sleep, nutrition and mobility in my opinion are the cornerstones of this.

  • Sleep: avoid caffeinated drinks after lunch and limit screen time before bed. If you can’t sleep, get up and move around! Laying there thinking about sleep often results in sleep anxiety which, in turn, is further disruptive.

 

  • Nutrition: get an ample amount of fresh fruit and vegetables, unrefined carbohydrates and protein as well as drinking enough water before, after and during training. Our body needs nutrition to fuel our performance – there are no Ferrari’s scooting around with 91 in the tank.

 

  • Mobility: A physiotherapist specialty. If you have a manual job or maybe your desk bound, how your body moves or doesn’t during the 8-10 hours you’re at work will directly correlate to your performance come game day. (See below for some examples of everyday mobility work that everyone should be endeavoring to add into their regime). If you can feel your back starting to stiffen up, or neck is getting sore hunched over a desk all day get it seen to, get some advice, and optimise your performance on and off the field.

 

2. Sports Psychology

With finals comes excitement. But for some, comes the pressure of performance.

When you hear any elite athlete talk, they often say “its 90% mental”. Having your head in the game, so to speak, is one of the biggest factors when returning from an injury or when playing sore.

Confidence leads to natural movement, hesitation leads to unnatural movement and a subsequent increased risk of injury, further decreasing performance.

Have a chat to someone senior at your club, your coach or a teammate that has been there before. And if you do have an injury – maybe an old calf that’s niggling or a shoulder that doesn’t feel quite right – get it seen to so that you can put to it to the back of your mind and you can once again solely focus on the sport at hand – stress free.

3. Training load

Although you’re fortunate enough to find yourself at the business end of the year, now is not the time to try and get fitter, stronger, and faster – that’s for the preseason.

The goal now is to maintain and rest up. You won’t lose any fitness doing three sets of ten on the bench press instead of your usual three sets of twelve!

Listen to your body. If you are unsure, come have a chat to a Physiotherapist. Load management – particularly pertaining to muscle tears, growth plate related issues in our junior athletes (e.g. Severs, Osgood Schlatters, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome) and tendon pathology – are daily conditions for physiotherapists.

Our goal as physiotherapists is to get you, the athlete, back to 100% ASAP, and with the proper management leading into the next month and beyond we are confident everyone will reap the rewards of a long 2018 season.

 

For more information or to make an appointment with Daniel you can BOOK ONLINE or call your local clinic.




Meet our ‘Netball Australia KNEE Program’ endorsed Physiotherapists

Knee are the most commonly injured body part of netballers. Injury to one of the major stabilisers of the knee, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), is a common problem, annually representing approximately 25% of serious injuries (Netball Australia National Insurance Data). The Netball Australia KNEE Program was developed with the support of the Australian Institute of Sport and is designed to reduce the incidence of these injuries occurring.

Recently Netball Australia announced that as part of the KNEE Program, it is looking to establish a network of physiotherapists proficient in delivering the program nationally. The completion of a course run by Netball Australia qualifies the physiotherapist as an Endorsed Provider of the program.

We are pleased to announce our two Netball Australia KNEE Program endorsed Physiotherapists – Emma Iacovou and Ellie Russo.

ELLIE RUSSO

EMMA IACOVOU

Emma and Ellie are both experienced Physiotherapists and netball players themselves. They currently treat many of the Peninsula Waves players and are passionate about the prevention of knee injuries in netball.

 

 

WHAT IS THE KNEE PROGRAM?
The KNEE Program is a warm up program designed to enhance movement efficiency and prevent injury. It targets how to land and how to move safely and efficiently.

Whether you are a coach to your child’s netball team, high performance coach, support staff or parent, this program is designed to keep your players on the court for longer and moving more efficiently when there.

As an athlete this program aims to keep you playing the sport you love without being sidelined by injury.

WHO SHOULD DO IT?

Three tiers have been devised to target all netball populations:

  • Junior (11 – 14 years)
  • Recreational (14 years and above)
  • Elite (players who have been identified in the Talent, Elite and Mastery category of Netball Australia’s Player Pathway)

 

WHY DO IT?

The KNEE Program is based on programs that have been proven effective in reducing lower limb injuries generally and specifically reducing ACL injuries from 40-70%. It will also improve efficiency of movement on court.

HOW LONG DOES THE PROGRAM TAKE?

The program should take no more than 10–12 minutes to complete. Research indicates it needs to be done for a minimum of 10 weeks, 2-3 times per week to be most effective.

For more information or to make and appointment with Emma or Ellie you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.

*Information above has been adapted from information provided at www.knee.netball.com.au and www.netball.com.au 




SPOTLIGHT ON: Therese Stegley – Physiotherapist / Pilates Instructor

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Therese Stegley, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic. In our chat, Therese gave us some insight into what motivated her to become a Physiotherapist and why former Australian Diamonds captain, Sharelle McMahon is her sporting hero.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

In high school I was always interested in science and played a lot of sport growing up. It wasn’t until I got to VCE and did Biology and P.E that I really realised that I loved anatomy and wanted to pursue some sort of job in the Health Science industry.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

Community sport forms a major part of why kids growing up continue with team sport for the rest of their lives. Most local clubs have an emphasis on camaraderie and respect and being a part of something like that really motivates you to be active and be a part of a team for years to come.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

As physiotherapists the last thing we want is for someone to no longer be able to play their favourite sport in the long run due to injury. Injury prevention is a main focus of people’s recovery and its important to not think of rehab as being a quick and easy fix. Educating patients and empowering them through knowledge makes it easier for them to understand their progress.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Competing at state level for netball and softball.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

My worst injury would have been when I snapped ligaments in my ankle playing netball. I wasn’t even on crutches for a week and I got fed up using them so I just walked without them. I wish I hadn’t! Still to this day my balance is bad on that ankle. I should have listened to my physio!

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

My sporting hero would have to be Sharelle McMahon (former Australian Diamonds captain). Although I play centre in netball and not shooter, I have always admired her dedication at an international level. She continued to play netball after snapping her Achilles Tendon and then having her first baby a year later, which I don’t think a lot of people could do. I’ve also met her numerous times and even though she’s retired she remains a part of Australian sport.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

Definitely time travel.

To make an appointment with Therese you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Ellie Russo – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Ellis Russo, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic. In our chat, Ellie shared why her mum is her greatest sporting hero!

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

I loved my families physiotherapist as a kid and would always tag along to appointments with mum so that I could see her. I also was heavily involved in sport growing up and found the human body and health really interesting so I guess I just combined them all together.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

I’m fortunate enough to still be involved in community sport as a player with Mt Eliza Football Netball Club. Its a great way top stay active and keep fit but more importantly I’ve made some great friendships throughout my time there. My sister and mum are also playing so we get to spend some family time there as well.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Empowering my patients through education surrounding their injury to help them feel more confident in their rehabilitation plan is very important. Once this has been achieved I believe looking at why the injury occurred in the first place and addressing these factors is important to ensure future injuries can be avoided. This means patients can spend more time doing what they love instead of spending it on injury recovery time.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Being a part of the Victorian Netball teams in my teenage years.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

Luckily I haven’t had any major injuries, just lots of jarred fingers from the netball court.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

My mum! She is in her 50’s and still playing netball and loving it, hopefully I”ll be doing the same when I’m her age.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

The ability to fly for sure!

To make an appointment with Ellie you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic helping the EDI-ASP EAGLES to fly

Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic (part of Peninsula Sports Medicine Group) is pleased to announce its new partnership with Edithvale-Aspendale Football and Netball Clubs.

Peninsula Sports Medicine Group has been involved in AFL within the local community for over 28 years with many of its physiotherapists having previously been part of elite clubs like St Kilda.

Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic brings a high level of expertise to the table. The Eagles teams will be looked after by Physiotherapists, Daniel Browne and Leroy Haines.

Daniel Browne

Daniel holds a Bachelors degree from Monash University where he graduated with honors. Daniel has also completed his Certificate III and IV in Fitness, as well as being an accredited AUSTSWIM swimming instructor. Daniel has also been involved with elite sports as a clinician securing a position at the AFL Women’s draft academy for the 2016/17 season, as well as more recently being selected as a physiotherapist at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games working athletes from weight lifting, para weight lifting, badminton and wrestling.

Leroy Haines

Leroy holds a Masters of Physiotherapy from Griffith University, having previously completed a Bachelors Degree in Exercise and Sports Science at Deakin University. Leroy’s areas of expertise include back and neck pain, headaches, overuse and tendon injuries, ACL and knee rehabilitation (having had an ACL reconstruction himself in 2009), sporting injuries and strength and conditioning.In addition to clinical work Leroy has worked with many sporting clubs across cricket, soccer, AFL, rugby and athletics.

 

Lachlan Goodison, Director, from Peninsula Sports Medicine Group, said the partnership reflects the strong commitment to community sport within Melbourne’s south.

“We’re looking forward to working with The Eagles coaching and playing groups to provide the latest evidence based knowledge, education and hands-on physio skills to assist in a successful 2018 campaign”

“We are absolutely passionate about being ingrained in our local community. Being injured is a frustrating time for any player. Actually talking to players about how injuries occur, the causes, how injuries can be prevented and what they should do to ensure an optimal recovery is a really important part of what we deliver”.

To make an appointment contact Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic on 9772 3322.




Calling all Netballers: Why your landing technique is so important in preventing injury

Recently two Physiotherapists from Peninsula Sports Medicine Group Langwarrin, Emma and Ellie, participated in a clinic run by Peninsula Waves Netball for young netballers at the grass roots level. During the clinic, the netballers were taught the technique behind how to jump, land effectively, decelerate and change direction based on the guidelines set out by the Netball Australia ‘KNEE Program’.

Both Emma and Ellie have a passion for netball and have played for Peninsula Waves in the past, so it was great to combine their passion for netball with their knowledge as physiotherapists to help ensure netballers continue to play the game they love for as long as possible.

Why is injury prevention in netball important?

Netball has one of the highest injury rates per participant of any sport (Fong, 2007). At both an elite and junior level netball injury prevention is vital. During this dynamic fast paced sport, the body is exposed to high forces contributing to lower body injury rates (Mothersole, 2013). A staggering 85% of netball injuries occur at the knee and ankle, of this 45% of these injuries occur during landing (Netball Australia Personal Accident Insurance 2010-14). These statistics highlight just how import the correct jumping and landing technique is to enhance performance and prevent injury.

Conditioning and technique training to effectively mitigate injury risk and improve performance is particularly important amongst the female population (Mothersole, 2013). Recent figures show females are 4-6 times more likely than males to rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and it is estimated that as high as 25% of all major injuries in netball are attributed to ACL alone (Netball Australia, 2017). For netballers this means a costly injury that can result in more than 12 months away from the netball court.

How can you reduce your risk of an injury during netball?

Netball Australia have developed The KNEE Program, aiming to prevent knee injuries from occurring by optimising technique and enhancing efficiency of movement in netball specific landing, change of direction and deceleration . The KNEE program is an adaptable, evidence based, warm up program designed to be implemented at all netball levels; children, recreational and elite.

Below is are some of the key principles as set out by the KNEE PROGRAM which outline how to perform a jump and landing with good technique that, when practiced and implemented, aims to significantly reduce the likelihood of an injury during netball.

 
Jump Take Off
• Feet shoulder width apart
• Feet facing forwards
• Hips Bent
• Knees Bent
• Knees in line with feet
• Use arms to drive momentum

 

Jump Landing

• Hips bent
• Knees bent
• Roll down through feet
• Feet straight ahead
• Knees in line with feet
• Trunk Stable

Studies show that by implementing specialised training programs, such as the KNEE program, injury rates can be dramatically improved. These programs can reduce lower body injuries by up to 50% (Netball Australia, 2017). Furthermore, employing this program as a part of your own training has been found to improve performance measures. This is supported by Hopper et al (2017) whom found a 6 week injury prevention program improved speed, agility, power and balance outcomes. For greatest effect, these programs need to be performed total of > 30 minutes per week (Sugiomoto et al, 2014).

It is never to early or late to start implementing this program as a part of your netball routine. For more information on how to include The KNEE program in your training session or warm up click on the following link : http://knee.netball.com.au/.

Written by Ellie Russo

For more information or to book an appointment contact your local clinic or Book Online.

 
References

The KNEE Program. Retrieved From: http://knee.netball.com.au/

Fong D, Hong Y, Chan L-P, Yung P, and Chan K-M. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports. Sports Med 37: 73-79, 2007

Hopper et al (2017). Neuromuscular training improves movement competency and physical performance measures in 11-13-Year-Old female netball athletes, Journal of strength and conditioning Research. 1165-1176, 31(5)

Mothersole, G. (2013) Ground Reaction Force Profiles of Specific Jump-Landing Tasks in Females: Development of a systematic and progressive jump landing model, Faculty of health and Environmental Sciences. Retrieved from http://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10292/5695/MothersoleG.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

Sugimoto, et al. (2014). Dosage effects of Neuromuscular training intervention to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: Meta-and-sub group analyses, Sports Medicine. 551-562, 44(4)

Netball Australia http://netball.com.au/




Does your child have persistent heel pain?

If you’re a young basketballer/netballer/footballer and have heel pain when playing sports involving running or jumping, you may have a particular growth pain disorder called Sever’s Disease.

What is Sever’s Disease?

It is a condition (not a disease) usually affecting 9-15 year olds that occurs at the back of the heel, where the Achilles tendon attaches to the foot. The Achilles tendon is the tendon connected to the calf muscles. Pulling of the calf muscles results in tension in the Achilles and in adolescents, repeated running/jumping can result in pain and inflammation at the heel – this is called Sever’s Disease.

Why does it happen?

Sever’s disease is often associated with a growth spurt, when the bones grow but the muscles do not. Therefore the muscles effectively become tighter which results in increased stress at the heel. It may also be related to unusual biomechanics, for instance poor foot posture, muscle tightness or muscle weakness. Overtraining or incorrect training can also play a part. Usually, the cause is a combination of factors.

What will the physiotherapist do?

The physiotherapist will thoroughly assess the affected areas and general mechanics to determine what factors may be contributing, also to rule out any other injuries or stress fractures, etc. Treatment focusing on the affected area will consist of modified rest, ice, massage, stretches and electrotherapy. A foam heel raise may also be given to help decrease pain.

The physiotherapist may also treat other areas if biomechanical problems are noted. This may include massage, mobilization and exercises to stretch and strengthen certain areas. They may also refer the patient to see a podiatrist if they believe the foot posture is a factor.

What about sport?

The term relative rest is often used. It is difficult to quantify an amount of activity because everybody is different and does different amounts and levels of sport. Pain-free activity is important for recovery. This usually means decreasing the number of sports played or the amount of training. Complete rest is rarely required.

Outcome

Sever’s Disease will settle, usually within six weeks to 12 months, but symptoms may persist for as long as two years, especially if you do not manage the condition properly.

If your child is complaining of heel pain whilst playing sport, make an appointment at your local clinic and have this assessed by a Physiotherapist.




Spotlight on Simon Johnson – Physiotherapist for Frankston YCW

Physiotherapist, Simon Johnson, from our Langwarrin Clinic, is currently the Physiotherapist for local Football Netball Club, Frankston YCW. We recently sat down with Simon to find out a bit more about what makes him tick…

What inspired you to become a Physiotherapist?

I have always been a massive sport fan, whether that’s playing, spectating or being part of the medical team. At school, I was most interested in science subjects, especially human anatomy. So I guess I paired my passion for sport with a genuine interest in the human body and chose to peruse physiotherapy as a career!

What does being part of community sport and specifically, Frankston YCW mean to you?

One of the best things about being involved in community sport is making new friends, whether that is with players, coaches or supporters. It’s a great feeling belonging to a network of people who enjoy footy but also interact in the community in which I enjoy being a part of.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Hard work equals goals. As a physio we may spend 40 minutes total with a patient per week. In that small amount of time I do as much as I can with my hands to help but it is the tools I give that patient to self manage through stretches, exercises, activity modification and behavioural changes that is really valuable. The patient has to put in some hard work to successfully rehabilitate and injury, being proactive and following the advice provided usually leads to great outcomes and speedy return to sport.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Winner of the 2014 Gentlemen’s Cup. An annual competition held amongst friends in which we compete in four events; table tennis, darts, lawn bowls and golf. The winners name is engraved into the trophy each year so I’m pretty proud of that.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

I’ve been pretty lucky with sporting injuries in the past. Worst injury was probably when I fractured my leg in footy. I was playing in the centre and was carrying the ball out of the stoppage and was chased down and tackled. Heard the crack and knew it was fractured. Worst part about it I was due to fly out that afternoon with friends on a surf trip to Gold coast, so I had to sit on the beach for two weeks watching the boys surf. A trick I learnt from that day was when you apply ice to an injury and the pain worsens, its often a telling sign that there is a fracture and an X-ray is a good idea!

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

Mick Fanning.

I thought it was pretty inspiring when he returned to Jeffrey’s Bay in South Africa one year after being attacked by a great white and not only entered the water where he was attacked, but won the event against the world’s best. That takes some serious bravery, courage and also skill! I don’t throw around the term hero much, but that to me was heroic!

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

It would be nice to have a magic wand with healing powers, save my hands from the pain of a long day of treatment!