Where is your pain really coming from?

Have you ever been to see a physiotherapist for pain in one part of your body and when they treated you, they focused on a completely different area? While this can be a strange experience, it can be even more puzzling when the treatment actually works. So what is going on, shouldn’t pain be treated where it is being felt?

When pain is felt at a different location from where the pain is being caused, this is called ‘referred pain’ and is actually more common than you think. Exactly why this happens is a little complicated, and in fact, we don’t yet understand everything about the way that pain is processed.

Pain is usually felt when something causes damage to the body, sending an electrical impulse to the brain. The brain receives this information and process it to make sense of which part of the body the signal is coming from and what kind of pain it is. When the brain thinks that the pain is coming from a different area than where the damage or signal is actually coming from, this creates the phenomenon of referred pain.

Sometimes referred pain is easy to explain, such as when a nerve becomes injured or irritated, causing the pain to be felt along the length of the nerve. This often feels like a sharp, burning pain that runs in a strip, along the skin. Other examples of referred pain are more difficult to explain and in some cases seem to defy explanation. Perhaps you have heard about the strange phenomenon of phantom pain where amputees continue to feel pain as though it was in the place where their limbs used to be.

Muscular trigger points can also cause referred pain. The mechanism behind this is a bit trickier to understand, but is thought to be explained by tight bands of muscle tissues that cause pain to be felt in predictable patterns around the body.

Adding to this, we know that other tissues of the body can cause pain to be felt in a different location, including discs of the spine and internal organs. Many times the internal organs can refer pain in peculiar patterns and this can actually lead to serious illnesses being mistaken for muscular aches and pains. Kidney pain can be felt in the lower back and tragically, some people fail to recognize that they are having a heart attack because they feel pain in their neck and arm, not in their chest.

We also know that not understanding or being afraid of pain can make pain feel stronger. In rare cases, people who have pain in one hand can feel pain just by seeing their other hand moving in a mirror. There are many other fascinating aspects to pain, and understanding how it works is an important part of managing your symptoms.

To understand how referred pain may be affecting you, chat to your physiotherapist who can help with any questions. You can BOOK ONLINE or call your local clinic.




Meet our ‘Netball Australia KNEE Program’ endorsed Physiotherapists

Knee are the most commonly injured body part of netballers. Injury to one of the major stabilisers of the knee, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), is a common problem, annually representing approximately 25% of serious injuries (Netball Australia National Insurance Data). The Netball Australia KNEE Program was developed with the support of the Australian Institute of Sport and is designed to reduce the incidence of these injuries occurring.

Recently Netball Australia announced that as part of the KNEE Program, it is looking to establish a network of physiotherapists proficient in delivering the program nationally. The completion of a course run by Netball Australia qualifies the physiotherapist as an Endorsed Provider of the program.

We are pleased to announce our two Netball Australia KNEE Program endorsed Physiotherapists – Emma Iacovou and Ellie Russo.

ELLIE RUSSO

EMMA IACOVOU

Emma and Ellie are both experienced Physiotherapists and netball players themselves. They currently treat many of the Peninsula Waves players and are passionate about the prevention of knee injuries in netball.

 

 

WHAT IS THE KNEE PROGRAM?
The KNEE Program is a warm up program designed to enhance movement efficiency and prevent injury. It targets how to land and how to move safely and efficiently.

Whether you are a coach to your child’s netball team, high performance coach, support staff or parent, this program is designed to keep your players on the court for longer and moving more efficiently when there.

As an athlete this program aims to keep you playing the sport you love without being sidelined by injury.

WHO SHOULD DO IT?

Three tiers have been devised to target all netball populations:

  • Junior (11 – 14 years)
  • Recreational (14 years and above)
  • Elite (players who have been identified in the Talent, Elite and Mastery category of Netball Australia’s Player Pathway)

 

WHY DO IT?

The KNEE Program is based on programs that have been proven effective in reducing lower limb injuries generally and specifically reducing ACL injuries from 40-70%. It will also improve efficiency of movement on court.

HOW LONG DOES THE PROGRAM TAKE?

The program should take no more than 10–12 minutes to complete. Research indicates it needs to be done for a minimum of 10 weeks, 2-3 times per week to be most effective.

For more information or to make and appointment with Emma or Ellie you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.

*Information above has been adapted from information provided at www.knee.netball.com.au and www.netball.com.au 




SPOTLIGHT ON: Therese Stegley – Physiotherapist / Pilates Instructor

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Therese Stegley, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic. In our chat, Therese gave us some insight into what motivated her to become a Physiotherapist and why former Australian Diamonds captain, Sharelle McMahon is her sporting hero.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

In high school I was always interested in science and played a lot of sport growing up. It wasn’t until I got to VCE and did Biology and P.E that I really realised that I loved anatomy and wanted to pursue some sort of job in the Health Science industry.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

Community sport forms a major part of why kids growing up continue with team sport for the rest of their lives. Most local clubs have an emphasis on camaraderie and respect and being a part of something like that really motivates you to be active and be a part of a team for years to come.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

As physiotherapists the last thing we want is for someone to no longer be able to play their favourite sport in the long run due to injury. Injury prevention is a main focus of people’s recovery and its important to not think of rehab as being a quick and easy fix. Educating patients and empowering them through knowledge makes it easier for them to understand their progress.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Competing at state level for netball and softball.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

My worst injury would have been when I snapped ligaments in my ankle playing netball. I wasn’t even on crutches for a week and I got fed up using them so I just walked without them. I wish I hadn’t! Still to this day my balance is bad on that ankle. I should have listened to my physio!

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

My sporting hero would have to be Sharelle McMahon (former Australian Diamonds captain). Although I play centre in netball and not shooter, I have always admired her dedication at an international level. She continued to play netball after snapping her Achilles Tendon and then having her first baby a year later, which I don’t think a lot of people could do. I’ve also met her numerous times and even though she’s retired she remains a part of Australian sport.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

Definitely time travel.

To make an appointment with Therese you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Alex Balnaves – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Alex Balnaves, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic. In our chat, Alex shared why community sport has played such an important role in his life.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

My interest started due to my involvement in local sports. I studied exercise science at university and became interested in injury management and rehabilitation. After having a couple of minor injuries through sport, I attended physiotherapy and the relaxed environment appealed to me.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

Community sport is a great opportunity to make friends and develop relationships with people in your local community. While studying physiotherapy, I lived in Bendigo and playing football in the area allowed me to become friends with people from different backgrounds, who I otherwise wouldn’t. It’s also a highly rewarding experience, as you put a lot of hours in to training and games.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Injuries are an unfortunate aspect of all sports, due to the unpredictable nature of the environment. My personal view of injury management is that we as physiotherapist’s have a wealth of knowledge in injury diagnosis and management, and providing support, advice and reassurance to our clients is the most important aspect of care. I also emphasise the clients role in their rehabilitation, as the time spent in physiotherapy is short, and active engagement with the rehabilitation process often leads to better outcomes.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

My proudest sporting moment would have to be winning a premiership at Wedderburn Football Club in 2017. I’d never won a flag before, so it was great to get that one after not playing football for 4 years.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

I’ve actually been very fortunate with injuries during my time playing sport (touch wood), the worst injury I’ve ever had was a large cut in my forehead from a misplaced elbow. I’ve also had two AC joint injuries, which I had assessed and managed at Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

Being a Saints supporter it would have to be Nick Riewoldt. I think what I admire most about him is the endurance and mental fortitude he brought to every game.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

The ability to fly would be pretty good, it would make getting around a lot easier, and you’d never miss a Grand Final.

To make an appointment with Alex you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Ellie Russo – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Ellis Russo, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic. In our chat, Ellie shared why her mum is her greatest sporting hero!

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

I loved my families physiotherapist as a kid and would always tag along to appointments with mum so that I could see her. I also was heavily involved in sport growing up and found the human body and health really interesting so I guess I just combined them all together.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

I’m fortunate enough to still be involved in community sport as a player with Mt Eliza Football Netball Club. Its a great way top stay active and keep fit but more importantly I’ve made some great friendships throughout my time there. My sister and mum are also playing so we get to spend some family time there as well.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Empowering my patients through education surrounding their injury to help them feel more confident in their rehabilitation plan is very important. Once this has been achieved I believe looking at why the injury occurred in the first place and addressing these factors is important to ensure future injuries can be avoided. This means patients can spend more time doing what they love instead of spending it on injury recovery time.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Being a part of the Victorian Netball teams in my teenage years.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

Luckily I haven’t had any major injuries, just lots of jarred fingers from the netball court.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

My mum! She is in her 50’s and still playing netball and loving it, hopefully I”ll be doing the same when I’m her age.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

The ability to fly for sure!

To make an appointment with Ellie you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Leroy Haines – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, meet Leroy Haines, Physiotherapist at our Mornington and Edithvale clinic’s and current Physiotherapist for the Edi-Asp Football Netball Club. Leroy chatted to us about how community sport helps improve life skills and his yearning for time travel!

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

I have always played a lot of sport and with that has come a lot of injuries and therefore physios. Being involved in sport sparked my interest in strength and conditioning and exercise and sports science. The main turning point that got me thinking about becoming a physiotherapist was in 2008 when I tore my ACL and MCL in a footy injury. Recovery from that required an ACL reconstruction a lot of physiotherapy. My physiotherapist for that rehab was actually Clinton Watson (Director of Mornington Central Physiotherapy). Since then, my passion for injury management and strength and conditioning grew and I completed a Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Science before doing a Masters of Physiotherapy.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

Being part of community sport means a lot to me. Since I could, I have always been involved in a variety of sports from Soccer, Rugby Union and Cricket, to Aussie Rules and many more. I’ve been involved to varying degrees, from playing to coaching and being a physio. I still continue to play competitive cricket and soccer. Being involved in community sport is a great may to meet people, establish relationships, and improve life skills.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Correct diagnosis and early management is crucial for optimal recovery and returning to full fitness as soon as possible. In the majority of cases, tissue heals best under load. So, as soon as it is safe to do so, I like to start loading the injured area with appropriate exercises. Muscular control and function is key to most injuries. Exercise plays the most important role in management and recovery.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player?

Representing Kent County in Cricket and Rugby at junior level.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

My worst injury was a ruptured ACL when I was 17. Recovery involved ACL reconstructive surgery and about 12 months of rehab. All in all I was out of sport for about 18months.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

AB de Villiers ( South African cricketer). His skills and no fear attitude towards the game. He backs his ability and isn’t afraid to take risks. Above all he is always a good sportsmen.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

Time Travel…the one thing that we lack in life is time. To be able to get more of it and to go backwards or forwards in time to different era’s would be amazing.

 

To make an appointment with Leroy you can BOOK ONLINE or call our Mornington Clinic on 5973 5511 or our Edithvale Clinic on 9772 3322.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Amy Decker – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, we sat down with Amy Decker, Physiotherapist at our Langwarrin clinic and current Physiotherapist for the Southern Saints AFLW Team. In our chat, Amy reveals her proudest sporting moment and what community sport means to her.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

When I was younger I played numerous different sports and sustained multiple ankle injuries spending majority of my spare time at a physiotherapist. In doing so I learnt a lot about the human body, anatomy and rehabilitation and began to enjoy similar subjects at school. Unfortunately I had some mis-treatments, which further inspired me to become a physiotherapist and to make a difference and positive impact to individuals along their road to recovery.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

Not only do I love being involved in any sporting team, I love giving back to the grassroots where we all start playing and being able to make an impact on athletes careers long term. Liaising with coaches, parents to gain the best outcome for the individual is very rewarding.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

My main philosophy is around injury prevention, why treat it if we can potentially avoid it. A great strength based program, nutrition, stretching and recovery are all important factors. The earlier we can intervene the better the outcome. Injury management should be individually created and criteria driven and not just a recipe approach following a general timeline as everyone is different.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player? 

Proudest sporting moment would either be representing Victoria in women’s AFL or winning the leagues Best and Fairest in the U18 AFL competition.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

Worst injury would be Gr II ankle injury with a separation of my syndesmosis (ligament between your tibia and fibia). Two days later, I flew to Perth to play football for Victoria as advised by the medical team – as a result, I have needed three surgeries since with long term effects. I received multiple opinions and all that I could do was continue with what I could control and that was my rehabilitation and recovery, keeping a positive mind set. The power of the mind is incredible and if you claim defeat then you are already beaten before you start, I have now returned back to playing basketball and continue to strengthen.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them? 

My sporting hero would be Stephen Curry, his work rate, habits, attitude and commitment to be better than he was yesterday is above and beyond. He is evidence ‘success is not an accident, its a choice.’

If you could have a superpower, what would it be? 

If I could have a super power it would be to fly, soaring through the wind above everyone else, and being able to travel to anywhere in the world without getting travel sickness!

To make an appointment with Amy you can BOOK ONLINE or call Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.




SPOTLIGHT ON: Daniel Browne – Physiotherapist

In our latest ‘SPOTLIGHT ON’ series, meet Daniel Browne, Physiotherapist at our Edithvale and Langwarrin clinic’s and current Physiotherapist for the Edi-Asp Football Netball Club. In our chat, Daniel shares how a bad personal injury changed his life and inspired him to be become a Physiotherapist.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST?

It combined my interests of human physiology, movement and education. Initially the inspiration stemmed from an interest in getting the most out of my own body athletically, however now equally it is very much about how I can improve the health and function of those around me.

What does being part of community sport mean to you?

It allows me to hopefully facilitate an athlete’s ability to meet their desired result at the grassroots level. I know first hand how hard it can be without support, but also how beneficial it can be with some. My goal is to make a profoundly positive impact on an individual or team and work with them to not only meet, but exceed their goals.

What is your philosophy around injury management?

Generally speaking your aim is to protect and strengthen the area and limit deconditioning as much as possible whilst always maintaining fundamental day to day function as you build back up to pre-injury capacity. I try to instill in people not only the skills and knowledge to optimise their recovery, but to prevent further injury and ultimately make them a better athlete then they were before.

What is your proudest sporting moment as a player? 

Achieving a top 10 placing at the 2017 IBJJF Brazilian Jiu Jitsu World Championships held in California, USA. I was incredibly proud to represent my club and country on the world stage, and to get a reasonable result was fantastic.

What is your worst injury and how did you overcome it?

Rupturing my ACL and MCL during school soccer at lunchtime in 2006 – it completely changed my life. I overcame it by finding a community that supported me, and by choosing a career that taught me the importance of goal setting and sound rehabilitation principals.

Who is your sporting hero and what do you admire most about them?

I have had various over the years for different sports but what always attracted me to them was that they were never naturally talented athletes – they were all hard workers who became elite in their given field.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be?

Indefinitely hold my breath and dive down into the depths of the ocean to go exploring (I can’t scuba because of asthma!)….So Aquaman?

 

To make an appointment with Daniel call Edithvale Physiotherapy Clinic on 9772 3322 or Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre on 9789 1233.